Thousand Island Lake, Ediza Lake, and Iceberg Lake Loop - Ansel Adams Wilderness, CA

This classic Sierra loop through Ansel Adams and Inyo National Forest was one of the most beautiful areas I've ever hiked through. The basin below the Minarets is filled with many beautiful lakes and creeks that I could have spent several more days exploring further.

 

Backpacking Trip Info

Dates: 7/23 - 7/26
Miles: ~30 roundtrip
Trail Type: Loop
Trailhead: Google Maps

 

Getting There

After getting an early start on the road, we made the obligatory Schat's Bakery stop to pick up some chili cheese bread before camping at Old Shady Rest Campground off the 203 near Mammoth. It was Elaine and Youssif's first backpacking trip, so we were lucky to have an additional day to acclimate before hitting the trail.

Home for the night in my favorite affordable backpacking tent - the REI Half Dome 2

Home for the night in my favorite affordable backpacking tent - the REI Half Dome 2

We woke early the next day to try to pass the kiosk at Minaret Summit before 7AM to avoid paying 7$/person for the shuttle, and we began packing our bags after parking in the dirt lot at the end of the windy and narrow road down to the TH at Agnew Meadows at 8340'.


The Hike

Starting from Agnew Meadows, it was a steady climb along the exposed High Trail.

At the Agnew Meadows trailhead parking lot

Backpacking along the High Trail to head into the mountains

Seeing Shadow Lake from across the gorge.. where we would be in a couple days!

The PCT had great views and was relatively flat after the initial switchbacks

Our first junction at 9710' after 5.2 miles

Our first junction at 9710' after 5.2 miles

It was another mile of hiking till the junction to Badger Lakes at 9590'. After another 0.4 miles we reached the junction with the River Trail at 9620'.

Merging with the River Trail

Merging with the River Trail

Even though we knew the first day was going to be the hardest, we were all quite exhausted as we ascended the final mile up a ridge up to Thousand Island Lake. We passed several other groups of backpackers who also seemed to be struggling with the final climb.

Excited for our first view of 1K lake just over this ridge

Excited for our first view of 1K lake just over this ridge

As we emerged on top of the ridge and saw Thousand Island Lake at 9840', we were all so relieved and amazed by the impressive view.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Thousand Island Lake was absolutely stunning

Thousand Island Lake was absolutely stunning

After reading the posted sign of restricted camping areas, we headed along the dirt trail that skirted around the lake to find a camp spot. Many other groups had already set up camp at the available spots, so we had to hike in about 0.4 miles before we found a great spot up on a smooth, rocky hill.

Our campsite had quite the view

Our campsite had quite the view

After setting up camp, we headed to the lake to pump water and swim. While the new backpackers took a nap, I continued climbing up a nearby peak to see if I could get a better view of the lake.

The view of Thousand Island Lake from the top of a nearby mountain

The view of Thousand Island Lake from the top of a nearby mountain

By the time we finished dinner, the sun had started to set. We were happy the strong winds kept the skeeters away, but we had only just started to see the cloudy band of the Milky Way come out before we turned into our warm tents.

It was a windy, but beautiful sunset

It was a windy, but beautiful sunset

The next morning Youssif and Elaine claimed they were awaken in the middle of the night by something circling their tent and brushing up against it. I thought they were just being paranoid, but when we looked around their tent there were definitely footprints around the tent! I often think I hear animal sounds at night that I attribute to the howling wind, so I was amazed. They however, were quite spooked for the rest of the trip. We got a late start, now on the JMT, since we had a short hike to Garnet Lake.

Crossing the outlet of Thousand Island Lake in fashion

Emerald Lake

The view of Garnet Lake before descending the switchbacks

The view of Garnet Lake before descending the switchbacks

It was 2.6 miles from the 1K lake junction to Garnet Lake at 9680'. When we got there, we didn't feel like setting up camp at 11AM and felt great, so we decided to continue on to make it to Ediza. After we crossed the inlet of Garnet, the JMT followed the opposite edge of the lake before climbing up some switchbacks. After 2.5 miles, we reached the junction at 9000' to Ediza Lake.

Turning on the trail towards Ediza Lake

Turning on the trail towards Ediza Lake

The planned short day turned into the hardest day of them all. We had another 2.3 miles and a 270' climb till Ediza lake, and everyone was beat.

Crossing the outlet of Ediza

Crossing the outlet of Ediza

When we finally caught a glimpse of the turquoise lake, we were so relieved, and amazed by the view. Ediza was the favorite of the trip for most of us.

Our favorite lake of the trip

Taking a packs-off break and enjoying the views before looking for a camp spot

After dropping our packs and following the trail along the SE side of the lake to find a campsite, we were unable to find anything on the rocky slope and marshy grass with a nice view of the mountains above the lake. From this side of the lake, we spotted a potential campspot on the other side, and we chose to continue clockwise around the lake rather than clamber over the rockfall on the NE shore. This turned out to be longer and more exhausting than we thought, as we had to cross the outlet, a grassy area, and climb over two large granite slopes. When we finally reached the site we had aimed for, we collapsed and were glad that it was actually a suitable campspot.

The view from our second night's camp spot

The view from our second night's camp spot

The wind had picked up since we set up camp, which meant we didn't see any mosquitoes.

Watching the sunset behind the Minarets

Pumping water near our campspot at Ediza Lake

Enjoying sunset from the perch near our campsite

Determined to see the sunrise, I set my alarm for 5:45AM. When I climbed out of the tent, I let out a shriek of amazement, getting Youssif out of his tent. We watched the sky change from a deep red to a bright orange, then to a golden warm yellow.

A fiery red sunrise over Ediza Lake

Clouds make great sunrises over lakes

The glowing Minarets behind Youssif

The glowing Minarets behind Youssif

Wildflowers by Ediza Lake, even in July

Not a bad place to sit bax and relax

edizalakebackpacking.jpg

That day we decided to follow a fellow hiker's advice to hike up to Nydiver Lakes. We didn't double check the map and followed the outlet all the way up a large ridge. Once we didn't find a lake over the large ridge and checked the map, we realized we should have followed the inlet rather than the outlet.. Instead we decided to cross country from our location to Iceberg Lake, which should have been an easy 2.5 mile hike straight from Ediza lake.

Once we climbed up one more ridge, the view of Iceberg lake sitting in a sunken valley hit us in the face.

Our initial view of Iceberg Lake

Our initial view of Iceberg Lake

We realized we were viewing Iceberg lake from the ridge circling the deep granite bowl. When I explored to see if we could find a way down to the water to take a swim, I found some steep cliffs and sheer dropoffs.

Eating lunch above the unique lake

Eating lunch above the unique lake

There were no floating icebergs in the water at this time, but we did spot a steep trail scaling the sloped sides up to Cecile Lake. From our angle, the trail looked very precarious and dangerous, and we could even spot several rock slides that seemed to cover parts of the trail.

The real 2.5 mile trail to Iceberg Lake

The real 2.5 mile trail to Iceberg Lake

Iceberg lake beneath the Minarets

After we finished lunch, we climbed back over the ridge to hike back to our campspot at Ediza Lake. Some parts of this cross country trek were very steep, and we had to carefully pick our way through a large rock slide at one point.

When we arrived back at camp, we packed up to try to decrease the miles we had left on our hike out the next day. Instead of hiking around the lake the way we came, we decided to brave the rockfall. Even though we went slowly, it was much faster than backtracking! After the 2.3 mile trek back to the junction, we continued on the JMT for 0.9 miles to Shadow Lake. We spotted several groups camping along the river during this section.

Beautiful Shadow Creek along the trail

Beautiful Shadow Creek along the trail

We stopped for a quick snack break at Shadow lake (restricted to camping) and decided to continue onto the River Trail to see if we could find a campspot further down.

Shadow Lake at an elevation of 8737'

Shadow Lake at an elevation of 8737'

We passed the outlet and started a section of endless switchbacks alongside the continuous river falling on a series of waterfalls. We realized we were now hiking along the long waterfall we spotted a couple days ago from the High Trail! This was a particularly beautiful portion of the trail, with views of the valley in front of us, and the series of waterfall behind us.

Valley view on the switchbacks down from Shadow Lake

Valley view on the switchbacks down from Shadow Lake

We were glad to have hiked the High Trail in, because the switchbacks up to Shadow Lake via the River Trail were steep and endless. The groups we passed on their way up looked quite beat. As soon as we reached the valley floor and crossed a wooden bridge, we found a camp spot complete with fire ring and benches to sit on.

Because of the thin cloud covering the entire sky, we enjoyed a sunset that painted the entire sky orange. Too bad we were in a valley for the best sunset we saw all week, but we did get to have a warm fire. It was the perfectspot to enjoy our last night out in the wilderness.

Our campspot along the River Trail

Our campspot along the River Trail

The next morning we woke up, quickly packed in anticipation of making it back, and hiked the final 3 miles in an hour and a half.

The relatively flat River Trail

The relatively flat River Trail

We ended up at the wrong parking lot, and had to hike along the paved road to finally reach our car. We threw everything in the trunk, paid the $10 fee on the way out, and were on our way home! Of course not without stopping by Schats for delicious, fresh sandwiches. Elaine and Youssif were stoked from their first trip and already could not wait till the next one. Success!

 

My favorite gear for this trip: